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Is Python Y2K (Year 2000) Compliant?

As of August, 2003 no major problems have been reported and Y2K compliance seems to be a non-issue.

Python does very few date calculations and for those it does perform relies on the C library functions. Python generally represents times either as seconds since 1970 or as a (year, month, day, …) tuple where the year is expressed with four digits, which makes Y2K bugs unlikely. So as long as your C library is okay, Python should be okay. Of course, it’s possible that a particular application written in Python makes assumptions about 2-digit years.

Because Python is available free of charge, there are no absolute guarantees. If there are unforeseen problems, liability is the user’s problem rather than the developers’, and there is nobody you can sue for damages. The Python copyright notice contains the following disclaimer:

  1. PSF is making Python 2.3 available to Licensee on an “AS IS” basis. PSF MAKES NO REPRESENTATIONS OR WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED. BY WAY OF EXAMPLE, BUT NOT LIMITATION, PSF MAKES NO AND DISCLAIMS ANY REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR ANY PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR THAT THE USE OF PYTHON 2.3 WILL NOT INFRINGE ANY THIRD PARTY RIGHTS.

  2. PSF SHALL NOT BE LIABLE TO LICENSEE OR ANY OTHER USERS OF PYTHON 2.3 FOR ANY INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR LOSS AS A RESULT OF MODIFYING, DISTRIBUTING, OR OTHERWISE USING PYTHON 2.3, OR ANY DERIVATIVE THEREOF, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY THEREOF.

The good news is that if you encounter a problem, you have full source available to track it down and fix it. This is one advantage of an open source programming environment.

CATEGORY: general